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Thread: Pro Coaching (full time Jobs)

  1. #11
    Cshipley is dead right.

    I myself am a full time coach, and havent played at a pro level or semi pro level yet I was the youngest manager of a semi pro team in England at my first job, and gaining respect was hard due to my age and not playing. Find yourself a local club and learn, don't rush yourself. Also, dreaming of management is all well and good, but unless you've played at a good level e.g Roy Keane and Sunderland you won't get management jobs before coaching, and coaching at a high level...you've got to remember that in leagues like the Isthmian and Northern Premier, most managers have got UEFA "B"'s and more, and thats still a few divisions below football league!

    Good luck anyway, if you want any advice at all give me a PM and I'll see if I can help.

    Also, Aidy Boothroyd was a professional footballer!

  2. #12

    reply

    To be honest, the best thing you could do, is to pass your level 1, enrol on your level 2 and contact a club about doing football in the community work there. At the same time as this try to get involved with coaching a sunday league team, or a local semi pro youth team. When you get your level 2 go back to the league club your coaching for and ask to be involved with the academy, either as a volunteer or a helper/assistant to one of the academy coaches. Then its up to how much you can learn from these people and the chances will come along. I've not played at any level other than sunday football, I'm a level 3 coach, working at a premiershiop academy,and i'm only 25 myself. I've worked for and with ex england coaches amongst others, and you can really learn a lot just by working with and listening to those guys. As for the sports science degree, I too do that course at university, ad was told that it would open up so many doors to me in sport. They lied, all i could get was a series of office jobs. To get into football coaching, you need experience and your badges, UNI WONT HELP YOU

  3. #13
    andypat - how did you get involved with the premiership club and at what level. im doing my level 3 in July, and once passed that will look to take up a full time coaching job - is it best just to write off to see what comes back??

  4. #14
    wba, you sound just like me a few years ago. Im now 17, and doing A Levels at school and doing coaching outside school. You need to take things SLOWLY! to say your going to get into Loughborough is a very long shot! and your only 15 at the moment! why the hell are you thinking about university and pro coaching at the age of 30? thats 15 years away! think about next month, and maybe next year. dont think 3 or 4 years into the future, because you dont know what might happen! who's to say loughborough uni wont burn down in a mass fire? who's to say you might be forced to move away from where you are living now? that could change everything! anything could happen, so dont look to far into the future. focus on the here and now, get your level 1, relax, get your level 2, relax and just coach! sort yourself out for now, not for 10 years down the line

  5. #15

    football coaching

    hi chaps

    can i jst say great advice from everyone on the site, ive jst been reading through all the comments wrote by everyone and they are very interesting,

    Iam currently employed by sheffield wednesday football club, my roles are Assistant community officer with football in the community , Disabily officer , and also development coach for the academy. i also run a very succsesfull senior team as a coach and a manager which i find very challanging to do. i personally thick u can be a very good manager and a very good coach. you cant be fantastic at both , you have to choose one of them. i am currently working towards my 'B' license and i have 4years of coaching from ages 3-5yrs primmary schools , secondary schools and 18+ keep the ambition but decide witch route you want to go down as this is very important.

  6. #16
    Dear wba1968mp let me address 1 or 2 points for you. You sound just like a lot of young people who have posted on here. The enthusiasm is fantastic and can only see success ahead. The reality is that unless you have played professional football then you are HIGHLY i repeat HIGHLY unlikely to be given the opportunity to coach or manage at a professional level. That is a fact and if you care to look into the backgrounds of every Manager and Assisstant and First Team coaches at every professional club in the country you will see that the evidence is irrefutable.

    Aidy Boothroyd was a player for Huddersfield Town, Bristol Rovers, Hearts, Mansfield Town and Peterborough United. Therefore why you would think that playing for loughborough first 11 would compare with that is quite beyond me.

    Also my friend, management normally arrives after coaching experience, contrary to some oppinion there is no need to decide which route you want to take. A coach moves up to a manager, a manager doesnt move to being a coach. It can happen though again not very likely. However, it must be noted that a good coach doesnt necessarilly make a good manager and the reverse is also true. Just as a side point to this, for as long as i can remember World football refer to Head Coaches what we refer to as Managers.

    To conclude. Getting your coaching badges is 1 thing but getting a job coaching or managing a professional team is quite another. With the best will in the world it is highly unlikely unless you have played professional football.

  7. #17
    The age old, I want to manage a league club questions.

    Just a quick point strass71, Paul Fairclough never played league football and never managed a league club till the around the age of 55 and what a fine job he is doing at Barnet right now!!!

    Getting into pro clubs aint easy, but can be done. It's all about who you know and a degree of luck to back up your skills as a coach. This is the same at all levels. Managers and coaches in step 3 and 4 often get the job because the board know what player they can bring to a club. It's not all down to your skills as a coach.

    I have been around coaches at, soccer schools or cheep babysitting service, development centres, all the way to the top and the amount you can learn off them is unreal. Everyone can bring something new.

    Your best bet is to do well in any exams you take, and get as much experience at all levels as you can, and you might just get a paid job at a pro team one day mate.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by cal900
    The age old, I want to manage a league club questions.

    Just a quick point strass71, Paul Fairclough never played league football and never managed a league club till the around the age of 55 and what a fine job he is doing at Barnet right now!!!

    Getting into pro clubs aint easy, but can be done. It's all about who you know and a degree of luck to back up your skills as a coach. This is the same at all levels. Managers and coaches in step 3 and 4 often get the job because the board know what player they can bring to a club. It's not all down to your skills as a coach.

    I have been around coaches at, soccer schools or cheep babysitting service, development centres, all the way to the top and the amount you can learn off them is unreal. Everyone can bring something new.

    Your best bet is to do well in any exams you take, and get as much experience at all levels as you can, and you might just get a paid job at a pro team one day mate.
    Thankyou for the correction. However, i didnt say it wasnt possible but i did say it wasnt likely. The fact that you found 1 out of the 92 league clubs rather empasises my point dont you think. Furthermore, may i point out that maybe whilst not making the a grade as a first team professional football player, Paul Fairclough actually beagn his career at anfield under the management of Bill Shankly. He simply didnt make the liverpool first team. He also spent around 14 years playing semi professional football. So whilst maybe not playing 'professional' football, he was certainly close enough for the points i raised to apply to even him - jobs for the boys whichever way you look at it.

    I must say though i am in total agreement with your comments about luck and the amount you can learn off other people. Even bad coaches have good points that can be worth noting and at the very least can demonstarte how not to do things.

  9. #19
    I think a huge advantage some people have is knowing people in the football world.

    The chairman of my local club knows Peter Beardsley and Alan Shearer. So i immediately, with a bit of luck have 2 brilliant contacts. Also, my ex manager works at St James' Park and looks after the players' family and friends on matchdays and is regarded highly within Newcastle United. He has already got me a possible coaching job in the summer working with Newcastle which would be a huge step in the right direction.

    Obviously experience is essential and perhaps the most important. Once you have relevant experience you can contact your contacts and see if they can help. Maybe if you can get one of them as a reference would be great. I mean imagine if I rang up a club like Gateshead (conference) and said I had Peter Beardsley as a reference!

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by WilsonKYPC
    I mean imagine if I rang up a club like Gateshead (conference) and said I had Peter Beardsley as a reference!
    Is this the same Peter Beardsley who was accused of bullying young players and never coached again?

    Just to go back to your point again strass71, Paul Fairclough did start out at Liverpool but there is no way that would give you an edge over anyone. He learnt his trade in non league and has won the conf tittle twice (Only manager I think). Year after year he unearths Gems, the latest been a 18 year old who was playing nothing more then park football 3 years ago. Has played 11 times and is been tracked by a number of Prem and Champ clubs.

    I havent worked for him but have met him on a number of occasion and he is one of the few really "nice" managers left in football.

    He treats and talks about the players like school kids (he was a PE teacher). Sometimes a player needs an arm around the shoulder but others a rocket up his arse to which his number 2 Ian Hendon a man I wouldnt want to get on the wrong side of obliged.

    WilsonKYPC, watch out you dont fall into the trap some football in the community set up's do of offering you work under contract which soon drys up.

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